Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

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dromia
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Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby dromia » Sun Jan 11, 2004 1:10 pm

As there have been problems on this forum due to America, Australia and Britain being three countries separated by a common language.

I have started this thread as a place where members can post problem words and terms for the explanation thereof by their author.
Last edited by dromia on Sat Sep 10, 2005 7:52 am, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby dromia » Sun Apr 10, 2005 2:20 am

How true Eoin, the three stages of man, my penile stage was never long enough though. ;) <p>[pic]http://www.photobucket.com/albums/1003/adamsutherland/Sutherland_Badge.gif" style="border:0;"/><!--EZCODE IMAGE END-->





Adam.





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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby 4godsako » Mon Apr 11, 2005 10:09 pm

Actually more anal than penile.......!!!! Especially with that *^(*&^*^(*^%$#@$ Howard (The Dwarf Dictator) firmly lodged(Lodged--Get it?? ..OK I suppose most of you don't) down in Canberra spewing forth slow,accumulative gun laws.<!--EZCODE EMOTICON START :nz --><img src=http://x9eralpha.home.comcast.net/NewZ.gif ALT=":nz">; <!--EZCODE EMOTICON START :( --><img src=http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/frown.gif ALT=":(">; <p>
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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby Flaith » Tue Apr 12, 2005 6:29 pm

Tut tut! old chap, don't confuse Adam...he'll think you're talking about Tony the Grin.





Lodged:lol:; :lol:; :lol:; I get it.





How many others do?





Eoin, <p>
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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby Flaith » Wed Apr 13, 2005 2:50 am

Er, Adam, your reference to length, is that in time or linear measurement?





Eoin<!--EZCODE EMOTICON START :) --><img src=http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/smile.gif ALT=":)">; <!--EZCODE EMOTICON START :) --><img src=http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/smile.gif ALT=":)">; <p>
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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby Flaith » Thu Apr 14, 2005 4:31 am

Anyone know 'dreckly' meaning shortly; in awhile etc?


I came across it in a book and remembered that I hadn't heard it for years, was common long ago, (in my childhood).





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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby dromia » Sun Apr 17, 2005 1:51 pm

Eoin,





I'm referring to both mate, at least at this time of life. :lol:;





Dreckly, is that not a variant of directly, "I'll be there dreckly (directly)"





:D; <p>[pic]http://www.photobucket.com/albums/1003/adamsutherland/Sutherland_Badge.gif" style="border:0;"/><!--EZCODE IMAGE END-->





Adam.





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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby Flaith » Fri Apr 22, 2005 10:30 am

Ah! Mon ami,


Et moi aussi,


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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby Flaith » Mon Apr 25, 2005 1:21 am

Thanks for putting Australia up there, perhaps we do have a language of our own...maybe 'Educated Pom'?





Anyway locally (at least in NSW) there are appearing exhortatory signs telling one not to be a "Tosser", not to throw away rubbish but to put it in the bin.


I seem to remember another meaning to "tosser" ??<!--EZCODE EMOTICON START :eek --><img src=http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/eek.gif ALT=":eek">;





Eoin. <p>
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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby dromia » Tue Apr 26, 2005 3:46 am

Eoin,





I can just see it up there on the poster hoardings "Wankers drop litter". :D; <p>[pic]http://www.photobucket.com/albums/1003/adamsutherland/Sutherland_Badge.gif" style="border:0;"/><!--EZCODE IMAGE END-->





Adam.





Why don't you visit .





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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby Flaith » Tue Apr 26, 2005 5:32 am

Just had an idea (poor lonely little fella), tomorrow I shall take a photo of one of the signs.





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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby Flaith » Tue Apr 26, 2005 11:24 pm

Tosser Signs.





[pic]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v174/Flaith/DSC00196.jpg" style="border:0;"/><!--EZCODE IMAGE END-->





[pic]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v174/Flaith/DSC00197.jpg" style="border:0;"/><!--EZCODE IMAGE END-->





The top sign is the only one left in town (photocopy on A4); the replacement is below, a more high-tech one that is pre-glued.





Must have been thought up by a real wanker.





Eoin. <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p089.ezboard.com/bmilsurpafterhours.showUserPublicProfile?gid=flaith>Flaith</A> at: 4/26/05 9:31 pm

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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby dromia » Wed Apr 27, 2005 2:05 am

As we say in this country, did he have hair on the palms of his hand and vote for Bastard Blair. <!--EZCODE EMOTICON START :eek --><img src=http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/eek.gif ALT=":eek">; <p>[pic]http://www.photobucket.com/albums/1003/adamsutherland/Sutherland_Badge.gif" style="border:0;"/><!--EZCODE IMAGE END-->





Adam.





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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby Amatikulu » Sun May 08, 2005 11:11 am

I have been sitting here today and re-reading the "stickys" on this forum. It struck me that the most dangerous word to mis-use would be "fanny."





In the USA, people wear "fanny packs" and patting a women on her fanny is common in public, and even on the TV.





In the UK, people would look at you strangely if you told them you were wearing a "fanny pack" and patting a women on her fanny might well earn you a slapped face or worse.











<p><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong><!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>""There is nothing so pleasing as to be shot at by one’s enemy without result."


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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby Flaith » Mon May 09, 2005 12:30 am

Down here too,'fanny' is a somewhat more intimate part of the female anatomy than that upon which a pack might rest and there is often mirth in American movies when none was intended.


A 'fanny-brush' on the other hand is commonly seen among the more hirsute of the male population (perhaps even among the female in these days of equality).





Eoin. <p>
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Re: Anglo / American Translator.

Postby 4godsako » Tue May 10, 2005 12:56 am

Well I've been known to "Chuck" after 20 schooners and a kebab and I'd look a right "Wally" if someone saw me doing it but when bending over to do so I'd also want to watch out for any "Bruces" that may want to give me a bit of a "Rodger(ing)"


:loco:; ********************************************************


A schooner is a glass size that beer is served in down here in <!--EZCODE EMOTICON START :Au --><img src=http://x9eralpha.home.comcast.net/Australia.gif ALT=":Au">;


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As they say in England.

Postby riptidenj » Tue Oct 25, 2005 2:41 pm

As they say in England "it's crackers to slip a rozzer the dropsy in snide."
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Postby Aughnanure » Wed Oct 26, 2005 9:48 pm

Whilst sitting in meditation upon the throne this morn, I thought of the now disused phrase (except by some of the older generation) "Going to spend a penny" as a euphemism for going to the 'bog'. Which word is interesting in itself as our ancestors, and in some more remote parts of Britain some people possibly still do go down to the bog.

Of course in Australia we never did go down to the bog...it's too bloody dry :) :lol:

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"it's crackers to slip a rozzer the dropsy in snide.&qu

Postby Niner » Wed Oct 26, 2005 11:09 pm

I give up. What's this mean in translation to American?
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Postby Tom-May » Thu Oct 27, 2005 6:04 am

Post subject: "it's crackers to slip a rozzer the dropsy in snide.&qu

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I give up. What's this mean in translation to American?


It's a somewhat archaic way of saying that it would be madness to attempt to bribe a policeman with countereit money.

Tom
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Postby Tom-May » Thu Oct 27, 2005 6:12 am

"...Which word is interesting in itself as our ancestors, and in some more remote parts of Britain some people possibly still do go down to the bog.
Of course in Australia we never did go down to the bog...it's too bloody dry..."


Eoin,

"Bog" is itself a contraction of "boggard" which Halliwell defines as "A Jakes" - jakes itself being a term for a latrine.

Now, does anyone know the origin of 'Khasi'/'Kharzi'?

Tom
The Truth IS Out There, The lies are in your head. (T. Pratchett - 'Hogfather'))
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Postby dogbolt » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:29 am

You're reference to "Kharzi" might have been basterdised indian speak from the troops that were stationed there in the days of the Raj. Like the euphamism for tea as "cha" or the original Indian word "chai" (pronounced chy).
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Postby dogbolt » Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:30 am

You're reference to "Kharzi" might have been basterdised indian speak from the troops that were stationed there in the days of the Raj. Like the euphamism for tea as "cha" or the original Indian word "chai" (pronounced chy).
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A "Senior Wrangler"

Postby riptidenj » Thu Oct 27, 2005 1:42 pm

I think this is an English academic term referring to a member of a debating team. Anyone?
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Postby Tom-May » Fri Oct 28, 2005 12:50 am

riptidenj,

"...Post subject: A "Senior Wrangler"

I think this is an English academic term referring to a member of a debating team. Anyone? ..."


I can't help with your question, but dare I hazard a guess that you read Terry Pratchett novels?

Regards

Tom
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riptidenj
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Postby riptidenj » Fri Oct 28, 2005 2:14 pm

Actually I saw this term in the book "The Patriotic Traitors" by David Littlejohn. He was discussing the character of Vidkun Quisling, the Norwegian Nazi leader. Littlejohn noted that Quisling was a very intelligent

but impractical man, and he said "he would have made an excellent Senior Wrangler."
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Postby Aughnanure » Sat Oct 29, 2005 2:58 am

Be all that as it may, my reference to 'spending a penny' brought back this memory from childhood/youth.

On the back of just about every public convenience (now there's a euphemism) door, among other jems of wit and wisdom, there was always this lament.

'"Here I sit,

Broken hearted.

Paid my penny,

And only farted".

Eoin.
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Postby Dave_n » Wed Mar 08, 2006 7:00 pm

If memory serves me correctly, a "Senior Wrangler" was the term for the senior security guard (in modern terms) but in the days when it was used, it referred to the people whose job it was to bring errant undergraduates at "Oxbridge" to their dean for suitable chastizement following too many pints! Dave_n
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Welcome to the site Dave_N

Postby Niner » Thu Mar 09, 2006 10:37 pm

Always good to see a new poster who has something interesting to offer.
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Please to explain

Postby BOLOMK1 » Mon Jun 05, 2006 8:47 pm

Pr'haps this is too elementary but it bothers me constantly.

Regarding the term "Bloody"

A.Does it have anything to do with "The Gunpowder Plot" and the execution of the conspirators?

B.Why was/is it in poor taste to use in polite company?(Or is it)

C.Does its usage/meaning change betwixt the UK/Oz/Eire/Scotland?

Ok,I am prepared to be educated or immolated by your collective erudition.

Simple John

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